Masters of Our Land

#indigenousEnglishIndonesianMasters of Our LandDURATION: 07:25PLACE: Raja Ampat, West PapuaDIRECTOR: Ina Mayor Matias owns a homestay in Yandebabo, a family-owned island in the majestic Raja Ampat area of West Papua. From his savings as a sensor operator, he …

Continue Reading

Mama Mariode

EnglishIndonesianMama MariodeDURATION: 04:50PLACE: Sorong, Papua BaratDIRECTOR: Agus Kalalu Mariode Malak and Kefas Gisim are the last standing block between the forest and a plantation corporation that is expanding operations on the banks of the Klasafet river. Their …

Continue Reading

Wamena

EnglishIndonesianWamenaDURATION: 06:23PLACE: Wamena, PapuaDIRECTOR: Bonny Lanny The Wamena culture regards pigs highly. The name Wamena itself comes from the word ‘Wam’, which means swine, and ‘Ena’, which means to tame. Every rite of passage is symbolised by the …

Continue Reading

Let us Sell Areca Nuts!

EnglishIndonesianLet us Sell Areca Nuts!DURATION: 04:10PLACE: Wamena, PapuaDIRECTOR: Dorkas Kossay Chewing areca nuts is a traditional pastime for the people of Wamena despite the fact that there are no areca trees in the town. Many women vendors sell …

Continue Reading

Jerry Can Coconuts

The Malind tribe in Merauke is proud of its ecological traditions – each clan in the tribe is responsible for protecting a natural element. The Moiwend clan is responsible for the coconut trees and their fruit. However, in recent times Malind youth have started using coconut plants to make alcohol. The home-made drinks – which are much cheaper to buy than beer and spirits – have added to the town’s problems. Now, some Malind elders are calling for the reinstatement of customary laws that would punish those who make use of coconuts in this way in order to save their tradition and their community.

Continue Reading

Awin Meke

Papuan women traders struggle to sell their goods in modern Jayapura. In their first fight, the women won a space to set up shop. However, local city administrators backed out of their promise to support them by opening a competing market, run by non-Papuans, which sells the same goods. ‘Awin’ is ‘mother’ in the Biak language, and ‘meke’ means ‘belonging’ in the Wamena language, so the mamas refer to ‘awin meke’ as ‘what belongs to us’.

Continue Reading