Mama Mariode

EnglishIndonesianMama MariodeDURATION: 04:50PLACE: Sorong, Papua BaratDIRECTOR: Agus Kalalu Mariode Malak and Kefas Gisim are the last standing block between the forest and a plantation corporation that is expanding operations on the banks of the Klasafet river. Their …

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Wamena

EnglishIndonesianWamenaDURATION: 06:23PLACE: Wamena, PapuaDIRECTOR: Bonny Lanny The Wamena culture regards pigs highly. The name Wamena itself comes from the word ‘Wam’, which means swine, and ‘Ena’, which means to tame. Every rite of passage is symbolised by the …

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Let us Sell Areca Nuts!

EnglishIndonesianLet us Sell Areca Nuts!DURATION: 04:10PLACE: Wamena, PapuaDIRECTOR: Dorkas Kossay Chewing areca nuts is a traditional pastime for the people of Wamena despite the fact that there are no areca trees in the town. Many women vendors sell …

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Love Letter to the Soldier

A letter from a Papuan woman to an Indonesian soldier who was once based in her village on the PNG-Indonesian border. Theirs was a controversial relationship but she begs him to return to meet their three-year-old daughter: “I will continue to wait for you, Samsul. I don’t care what people say.”

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What Mama Kasmira Wants

A Papuan cocoa farmer from the Indonesia-Papua New Guinea border region had to leave her farm to work for a palm plantation when the village elders made a deal with a Rajawali Group company to sell her land. Every day Kasmira works hard under the boiling hot sun, clearing bushes for the plantation. However, she has great hopes for her three children.

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Awin Meke

Papuan women traders struggle to sell their goods in modern Jayapura. In their first fight, the women won a space to set up shop. However, local city administrators backed out of their promise to support them by opening a competing market, run by non-Papuans, which sells the same goods. ‘Awin’ is ‘mother’ in the Biak language, and ‘meke’ means ‘belonging’ in the Wamena language, so the mamas refer to ‘awin meke’ as ‘what belongs to us’.

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